Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Tell Hadidi: One Bronze Age Site among Many in the Tabqa Dam Salvage Area

Rudolph H. Dornemann
Bulletin of the American Schools of Oriental Research
No. 270, Ancient Syria (May, 1988), pp. 13-42
DOI: 10.2307/1357003
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1357003
Page Count: 30
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($9.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Tell Hadidi: One Bronze Age Site among Many in the Tabqa Dam Salvage Area
Preview not available

Abstract

This article presents the results of the excavations at Tell Hadidi in Syria between 1974 and 1978. It concentrates on the Bronze Age remains, in particular the Early Bronze Age sequence not presented in detail in previous reports. It is now possible not only to elucidate a complete sequence of the periods at Tell Hadidi but also to fill in the basic outline with significant detail in many chronological phases. The sequence at the beginning of the Bronze Age provides a particularly important bridge between earlier Protoliterate remains and the beginning of the Early Bronze Age tradition. Stratified diagnostic sherds define the EB I and EB II phases and provide solid links to other excavated sequences. A large corpus of tomb pottery fills out the basic stratified sequence for EB III through EB IV and provides significant material with which to refine a rich ceramic inventory. Limited but valuable evidence for parallels with different regional traditions are noted. The Middle and Late Bronze Age sequences, reported previously, are reviewed only briefly.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
13
    13
  • Thumbnail: Page 
14
    14
  • Thumbnail: Page 
15
    15
  • Thumbnail: Page 
16
    16
  • Thumbnail: Page 
17
    17
  • Thumbnail: Page 
18
    18
  • Thumbnail: Page 
19
    19
  • Thumbnail: Page 
20
    20
  • Thumbnail: Page 
21
    21
  • Thumbnail: Page 
22
    22
  • Thumbnail: Page 
23
    23
  • Thumbnail: Page 
24
    24
  • Thumbnail: Page 
25
    25
  • Thumbnail: Page 
26
    26
  • Thumbnail: Page 
27
    27
  • Thumbnail: Page 
28
    28
  • Thumbnail: Page 
29
    29
  • Thumbnail: Page 
30
    30
  • Thumbnail: Page 
31
    31
  • Thumbnail: Page 
32
    32
  • Thumbnail: Page 
33
    33
  • Thumbnail: Page 
34
    34
  • Thumbnail: Page 
35
    35
  • Thumbnail: Page 
36
    36
  • Thumbnail: Page 
37
    37
  • Thumbnail: Page 
38
    38
  • Thumbnail: Page 
39
    39
  • Thumbnail: Page 
40
    40
  • Thumbnail: Page 
41
    41
  • Thumbnail: Page 
42
    42