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Early Greek Contacts with the Southern Levant, ca. 1000-600 B. C.: The Eastern Perspective

Jane C. Waldbaum
Bulletin of the American Schools of Oriental Research
No. 293 (Feb., 1994), pp. 53-66
DOI: 10.2307/1357277
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1357277
Page Count: 14
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Early Greek Contacts with the Southern Levant, ca. 1000-600 B. C.: The Eastern Perspective
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Abstract

Studies of early Greek contacts with the Levant have focused primarily on the presence in Greece of imported luxury goods from the east and on the possible impact of those artifacts, and perhaps their itinerant makers, on the development of the Orientalizing style of Greek art. Alternatively, research on Greek imports in the Levant has concentrated on specific areas, including in particular Al Mina in Syria, Cyprus, and the Egyptian Delta. The rest of the Levantine coast, south of Syria, has been relatively neglected as a source of information on relations between Greece and the East. On the basis of finds from both new and old excavations, this article examines the evidence for early Greek contacts with the southern Levant, concentrating specifically on Greek imports (primarily pottery) found in Palestine. The resulting picture is compared both qualitatively and quantitatively with contact patterns from better-known regions of the Mediterranean; the possible role of some sites in the dissemination of Greek pottery inland from the coast is assessed.

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