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The Iron Age Kingdom of Marion

William A. P. Childs
Bulletin of the American Schools of Oriental Research
No. 308, The City-Kingdoms of Early Iron Age Cyprus in Their Eastern Mediterranean Context (Nov., 1997), pp. 37-48
DOI: 10.2307/1357408
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1357408
Page Count: 12
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The Iron Age Kingdom of Marion
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Abstract

Princeton University archaeology teams have been digging at Polis Chrysochous (ancient Marion and Arsinoe), Cyprus, since 1983. Good evidence for the Iron Age is limited to sanctuaries of the seventh and sixth centuries B. C. but there are also scattered traces of earlier periods. The rare domestic remains are very poorly preserved in shallow deposits. Foreign contacts begin in the seventh century but first become important in the sixth century, a conclusion confirmed by over 100 years of excavation in the large cemeteries surrounding the site. The political structure of the Archaic kingdom of Marion has left no archaeological traces, but the similarity of pottery found throughout the Chrysochou Valley from the sixth century B. C. on indicates a cohesive geographic unit. The tombs provide no insight into social stratification. The one well-preserved sanctuary (B. D7) does provide good evidence on cult and the range of Attic imported pottery aids the study of trade in the eastern Mediterranean.

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