Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

Trans-Beringia Comparisons of Mitochondrial DNA Differentiation in Birds

Robert M. Zink, Sievert Rohwer, Alexander V. Andreev and Donna L. Dittmann
The Condor
Vol. 97, No. 3 (Aug., 1995), pp. 639-649
DOI: 10.2307/1369173
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1369173
Page Count: 11
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($12.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
Trans-Beringia Comparisons of Mitochondrial DNA Differentiation in Birds
Preview not available

Abstract

We compared mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) restriction fragment profiles from samples of 13 bird species that occur on both sides of Beringia. All but two species, Lapland Longspur (Calcarius lapponicus) and Green-winged Teal (Anas crecca), exhibited evidence of genetic differentiation, albeit at varying degrees. Several species exhibited mtDNA differentiation consistent with species-level distinctness: Marbled Murrelet (Brachyramphus marmoratus), Three-toed Woodpecker (Picoides tridactylus), Whimbrel (Numenius phaeopus), Mew Gull (Larus canus), Black-billed Magpie (Pica pica), American Pipit (Anthus rubescens), and Rosy Finch (Leucosticte arctoa). Other species exhibited levels of mtDNA differentiation intermediate between populations and species: Barn Swallow (Hirundo rustica), Common Tern (Sterna hirundo), Common Snipe (Gallinago gallinago), and Pelagic Cormorant (Phalacrocorax pelagicus). Because of small sample sizes, we do not recommend formal taxonomic changes, although our data could be combined with other data to raise several taxa to species level. Our data do not indicate a consistent level of mtDNA differentiation between putatively conspecific populations on different sides of Beringia, suggesting different times of colonization or cessation of gene exchange. Most comparisons of birds within continents exhibit less mtDNA differentiation than our trans-Beringia comparisons, suggesting limited gene flow between continents.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
639
    639
  • Thumbnail: Page 
640
    640
  • Thumbnail: Page 
641
    641
  • Thumbnail: Page 
642
    642
  • Thumbnail: Page 
643
    643
  • Thumbnail: Page 
644
    644
  • Thumbnail: Page 
645
    645
  • Thumbnail: Page 
646
    646
  • Thumbnail: Page 
647
    647
  • Thumbnail: Page 
648
    648
  • Thumbnail: Page 
649
    649