Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

Habitat and Food Selection by Emperor Goose Goslings

Karen K. Laing and Dennis G. Raveling
The Condor
Vol. 95, No. 4 (Nov., 1993), pp. 879-888
DOI: 10.2307/1369425
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1369425
Page Count: 10
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($12.00)
  • Cite this Item
If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
Habitat and Food Selection by Emperor Goose Goslings
Preview not available

Abstract

The habitat and diet of Emperor Goose (Chen canagica) goslings were studied on the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta, Alaska in 1985 and 1986. We studied diet selection and nutrient content of potential food plants to determine whether Emperor Goose goslings selected food plants to increase nutrient intake. Broods moved from inland nest sites to coastal salt marsh within one week of hatching. This movement resulted in abandonment of areas that contained high densities of Triglochin palustris, a food that was selected in a feeding trial. Wild goslings selected vegetated mudflats in coastal salt marsh, spending 80-82% of their feeding time there, although mudflats covered only 5% of the study area. The relative densities of Puccinellia phryganodes and Carex subspathacea, the two mudflat plant species available on a feeding trial plot, changed over the two years of the study, with P. phryganodes increasing from 65% in 1985 to 84% in 1986. Captive goslings selected C. subspathacea more often than P. phryganodes in 1985, but ate primarily P. phryganodes in 1986. Triglochin palustris was significantly higher in total nitrogen and water content and lower in cell wall content than other available species, but productivity and nutrient value of P. phryganodes and C. subspathacea might increase with grazing. Emperor Geese may leave areas where T. palustris is available to avoid predation or competition. By feeding repeatedly on coastal mudflats goslings are likely to find recently fertilized, nitrogen-rich plant food in a habitat providing refuge from predators.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
879
    879
  • Thumbnail: Page 
880
    880
  • Thumbnail: Page 
881
    881
  • Thumbnail: Page 
882
    882
  • Thumbnail: Page 
883
    883
  • Thumbnail: Page 
884
    884
  • Thumbnail: Page 
885
    885
  • Thumbnail: Page 
886
    886
  • Thumbnail: Page 
887
    887
  • Thumbnail: Page 
888
    888