If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

Brown Thrasher Nest Reuse: A Time Saving Resource, Protection from Search-Strategy Predators, or Cues for Nest-Site Selection?

John F. Cavitt, Aaron T. Pearse and Todd A. Miller
The Condor
Vol. 101, No. 4 (Nov., 1999), pp. 859-862
DOI: 10.2307/1370076
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1370076
Page Count: 4
  • Download PDF
  • Cite this Item

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
Brown Thrasher Nest Reuse: A Time Saving Resource, Protection from Search-Strategy Predators, or Cues for Nest-Site Selection?
Preview not available

Abstract

We examined the potential functions of old nests in a population of Brown Thrashers (Toxostoma rufum) nesting on the Konza Prairie Research Natural Area in northeastern Kansas. We determined whether thrashers reuse nests constructed in previous years, and tested predictions of the hypothesis that old nests function to reduce the risk of nest predation by saturating the cues used by search-strategy predators. We also manipulated old-nest densities to test the hypothesis that old nests are used as indirect cues for nest-site selection. Thrashers were found to reuse nests, albeit at low rates (4% of nests monitored). We found no significant relationships between the density of old nests and the success of active nests, and experimentally removing nests did not influence nest-site selection. These results suggest that old nests may only benefit thrashers in this population as a resource to reduce the time spent in nest construction.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
859
    859
  • Thumbnail: Page 
860
    860
  • Thumbnail: Page 
861
    861
  • Thumbnail: Page 
862
    862