Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

Ruddy Duck Nesting Success: Do Nest Characteristics Deter Nest Predation?

Robert B. Brua
The Condor
Vol. 101, No. 4 (Nov., 1999), pp. 867-870
DOI: 10.2307/1370078
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1370078
Page Count: 4
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
Ruddy Duck Nesting Success: Do Nest Characteristics Deter Nest Predation?
Preview not available

Abstract

It has been hypothesized that proximity to edges, timing of nesting, nest concealment or in-accessibility, working singly or in concert, may explain variable nesting success of birds, but results have been mixed. I tested these hypotheses by determining fates and measuring nest-site features of 233 Ruddy Duck (Oxyura jamaicensis) nests near Minnedosa, Manitoba, Canada, during summers of 1994-1996. Mayfield nesting success averaged 41%. Discriminant function analysis was unable to segregate successful and destroyed nests. Results suggest that nesting success for this population of Ruddy Ducks is unpredictable, probably because a diversity of predators precluded choice of safe nest sites.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
867
    867
  • Thumbnail: Page 
868
    868
  • Thumbnail: Page 
869
    869
  • Thumbnail: Page 
870
    870