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Ruddy Duck Nesting Success: Do Nest Characteristics Deter Nest Predation?

Robert B. Brua
The Condor
Vol. 101, No. 4 (Nov., 1999), pp. 867-870
DOI: 10.2307/1370078
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1370078
Page Count: 4
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Ruddy Duck Nesting Success: Do Nest Characteristics Deter Nest Predation?
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Abstract

It has been hypothesized that proximity to edges, timing of nesting, nest concealment or in-accessibility, working singly or in concert, may explain variable nesting success of birds, but results have been mixed. I tested these hypotheses by determining fates and measuring nest-site features of 233 Ruddy Duck (Oxyura jamaicensis) nests near Minnedosa, Manitoba, Canada, during summers of 1994-1996. Mayfield nesting success averaged 41%. Discriminant function analysis was unable to segregate successful and destroyed nests. Results suggest that nesting success for this population of Ruddy Ducks is unpredictable, probably because a diversity of predators precluded choice of safe nest sites.

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