Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

Singing Behavior, Mating Associations and Reproductive Success in a Population of Hybridizing Lazuli and Indigo Buntings

Myron C. Baker and Jeanette T. Boylan
The Condor
Vol. 101, No. 3 (Aug., 1999), pp. 493-504
DOI: 10.2307/1370179
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1370179
Page Count: 12
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($12.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
Singing Behavior, Mating Associations and Reproductive Success in a Population of Hybridizing Lazuli and Indigo Buntings
Preview not available

Abstract

Populations of Lazuli Buntings (Passerina amoena) and Indigo Buntings (P. cyanea) overlap in their distribution and hybridize in the Great Plains of North America. We conducted a 4-year field study of color-banded Indigo, Lazuli, and hybrid Buntings to address questions about mating behavior, male song and plumage traits, and reproductive success. From previous studies, we knew that males of these two taxa can learn one another's song traits and that song is important in eliciting sexual behavior in females. Here, we explore the possible role of intersexual vocal communication in explaining hybrid matings. We classified males and females as lazuli, indigo, or hybrid on the basis of plumage, and recorded male songs and described their acoustic features. We tested for associations between song traits and plumage phenotypes of the males, and between plumage phenotypes of females and the plumage and song traits of their mates. We found positive assortative mating between male and female plumage types, and between male song phrases and female plumage. Data on reproductive success of the different mating associations suggest lower fitness of pairings involving hybrids, especially those in which the female was hybrid. We conclude that there is selection against hybrids, but that between-species crosses are relatively common because, at least to some degree, females use learned song traits of males in mate choice.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
493
    493
  • Thumbnail: Page 
494
    494
  • Thumbnail: Page 
495
    495
  • Thumbnail: Page 
496
    496
  • Thumbnail: Page 
497
    497
  • Thumbnail: Page 
498
    498
  • Thumbnail: Page 
499
    499
  • Thumbnail: Page 
500
    500
  • Thumbnail: Page 
501
    501
  • Thumbnail: Page 
502
    502
  • Thumbnail: Page 
503
    503
  • Thumbnail: Page 
504
    504