Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

The Role of Ornithology in Conservation of the American West

Carl E. Bock
The Condor
Vol. 99, No. 1 (Feb., 1997), pp. 1-6
DOI: 10.2307/1370218
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1370218
Page Count: 6
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
The Role of Ornithology in Conservation of the American West
Preview not available

Abstract

Joseph Grinnell, first Director of the Museum of Vertebrate Zoology at the University of California, Berkeley, was a dedicated and remarkably prescient conservationist, as well as a pioneer western ornithologist. He was one of the first to recognize that birds have particular value in conservation because of their charisma, familiarity, and sensitivity to environmental conditions. History has proven Grinnell right, as evidenced by the influence of birds and ornithology in efforts to protect species and their habitats. However, threats to natural landscapes in western North America continue on a scale even Grinnell might not have predicted. Ornithologically-based conservation efforts must be re-doubled, focused on subjects such as landscape and metapopulation models specifically for western habitats, the use of large-scale data sets, the genetic structure of species and populations, avian responses to environmental stressors and disease, and studies of birds in winter.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
1
    1
  • Thumbnail: Page 
2
    2
  • Thumbnail: Page 
3
    3
  • Thumbnail: Page 
4
    4
  • Thumbnail: Page 
5
    5
  • Thumbnail: Page 
6
    6