Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access JSTOR through your library or other institution:

login

Log in through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Journal Article

Effects of Small Forest Openings on the Breeding Bird Community in a Vermont Hardwood Forest

Stephen S. Germaine, Stephen H. Vessey and David E. Capen
The Condor
Vol. 99, No. 3 (Aug., 1997), pp. 708-718
DOI: 10.2307/1370482
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1370482
Page Count: 11
Were these topics helpful?
See somethings inaccurate? Let us know!

Select the topics that are inaccurate.

Cancel
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($12.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Add to My Lists
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Effects of Small Forest Openings on the Breeding Bird Community in a Vermont Hardwood Forest
Preview not available

Abstract

We examined the response of a forest bird community to the presence of small openings created by patch clear-cutting 0.4-ha plots within an extensive northern hardwood forest. We conducted bird censuses (June) and habitat measurements (July-August) in 102 census plots at four distances from openings in 1991 and 1992. Of 19 habitat variables measured, none differed significantly among forest plots at any distance from clear-cuts. Thirty-five (70%) of 50 bird species encountered during censusing were Neotropical migrants. Bird species richness did not differ as a function of distance from openings. However, species composition in plots within openings was least similar to that in plots farthest into forest, and most similar between the two distance categories farthest from openings. The movement of several forest-interior species away from openings, the addition of early-successional colonists in openings, and a high abundance of interior-edge species near openings contributed to the difference in species composition between openings and forest plots. As a group, Neotropical forest-interior migrants were significantly less abundant in openings than at any distance from them, and less abundant 50 m from openings than 200 m from them. Neotropical interior-edge migrants were significantly more abundant 50 m from openings than at any other distance. Nearctic migrants and nonmigrants did not respond to the presence of small openings. Of three locally common avian nest predators, none became more abundant in the openings. Brown-headed Cowbirds (Molothrus ater), also common locally, were never observed in or near the openings. Overall, bird species diversity increased in forested areas containing small openings due to the addition of edge and openarea nesters, but several forest-interior species were adversely affected by the presence of openings.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
708
    708
  • Thumbnail: Page 
709
    709
  • Thumbnail: Page 
710
    710
  • Thumbnail: Page 
711
    711
  • Thumbnail: Page 
712
    712
  • Thumbnail: Page 
713
    713
  • Thumbnail: Page 
714
    714
  • Thumbnail: Page 
715
    715
  • Thumbnail: Page 
716
    716
  • Thumbnail: Page 
717
    717
  • Thumbnail: Page 
718
    718
Part of Sustainability