Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Early Onset of Incubation by Wood Ducks

Gary R. Hepp
The Condor
Vol. 106, No. 1 (Feb., 2004), pp. 182-186
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1370531
Page Count: 5
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($12.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Early Onset of Incubation by Wood Ducks
Preview not available

Abstract

I examined onset of incubation in Wood Ducks (Aix sponsa) and evaluated the hypotheses that early onset improves hatchability, reduces brood parasitism, and shortens incubation periods. Most (21 of 22) females began incubating at night, a median of 4 days before egg laying ended. Nocturnal incubation bouts began 18 min before sunset, ended 15 min before sunrise, lasted 732 min each night, and totaled 47.2 hr before egg-laying ended (means). Nocturnal incubation did not begin earlier in the egg-laying period as the breeding season progressed, as would be expected if it improved hatchability of first-laid eggs. Early onset of incubation did not reduce brood parasitism. Females ended nocturnal incubation 35 min before egg laying began, the number of nights of incubation was not related to the number of parasitic eggs laid, and most (83%) nests were parasitized. In support of the third hypothesis, egg-laying females spending more nights incubating had somewhat shorter incubation periods. /// Examiné el inicio del período de incubación en patos de la especie Aix sponsa y evalué las hipótesis de que el comienzo temprano mejora la probabilidad de eclosión, reduce el parasitismo de la nidada y acorta el período de incubación. La mayoría (21 de 22) de las hembras comenzaron a incubar durante la noche, 4 días (mediana) antes que la puesta de huevos terminara. En promedio, la incubación nocturna comenzó 18 min antes del anochecer, terminó 15 min antes del amanecer, duró 732 min cada noche y totalizó 47.2 hr antes que la puesta de huevos terminara. La incubación nocturna no comenzó más temprano durante el período de puesta de huevos a medida que la estación reproductiva avanzó, como se esperaría si ésta mejorase la probabilidad de eclosión de los primeros huevos puestos. El inicio temprano de la incubación no redujo el parasitismo de la nidada. Las hembras terminaron la incubación nocturna 35 min antes que la puesta de huevos comenzara, el número de noches de incubación no se relacionó con el número de huevos de aves parásitas puestos y la mayoría (83%) de los nidos fueron parasitados. En apoyo a la tercera hipótesis, encontramos que las hembras que pusieron huevos y que pasaron más noches incubando tuvieron períodos de incubación un poco más cortos.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
182
    182
  • Thumbnail: Page 
183
    183
  • Thumbnail: Page 
184
    184
  • Thumbnail: Page 
185
    185
  • Thumbnail: Page 
186
    186