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Journal Article

Acoustics of White-Tailed Deer (Odocoileus virginianus)

Larry W. Richardson, Harry A. Jacobson, Robert J. Muncy and Carroll J. Perkins
Journal of Mammalogy
Vol. 64, No. 2 (May, 1983), pp. 245-252
DOI: 10.2307/1380554
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1380554
Page Count: 8

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Topics: Fawns, Deer, Sound pitch, Gender discrimination, Siblings, Acoustics, Sound, Phonetics, Juveniles, Personal hygiene
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Acoustics of White-Tailed Deer (Odocoileus virginianus)
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Abstract

Eight stereotypic sounds of white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) are distinguished: 1) bleat, 2) distress call, 3) nursing whine, 4) grunt, 5) alert-snort, 6) footstomp, 7) snortwheeze, and 8) aggressive snort. Only the grunt was associated with both dominant-subordinate and cohesive behavior. The grunt, alert-snort, footstomp, snort-wheeze, and aggressive snort originated from yearling and older deer. The nursing whine was heard only from fawns, and the bleat was emitted only by fawns and juveniles. The distress call was made by both sexes of juveniles and adults. Twelve voice parameters, expressing unique phonetic qualities of distress calls from 10 neonatal fawns, allowed significant discrimination of individual fawns, sibling pairs, and between sex and weight.

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