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A Quantitative Analysis of the Contributions of Female Mammalogists from 1919 to 1994

Felisa A. Smith and Dawn M. Kaufman
Journal of Mammalogy
Vol. 77, No. 3 (Aug., 1996), pp. 613-628
DOI: 10.2307/1382668
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1382668
Page Count: 16
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
A Quantitative Analysis of the Contributions of Female Mammalogists from 1919 to 1994
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Abstract

We quantified the contributions that women have made to mammalogy by surveying the 75 volumes (301 issues) of the Journal of Mammalogy from its origin in 1919 through 1994. Data were collected on publications (articles and notes), participation in The American Society of Mammalogists (ASM; membership, meeting attendees, committee members, and officers), and awards and honoraria. We found that women played a small, but significant, role in the Society from the outset, and that involvement in all facets has increased substantially since the late 1970s. As of 1994, women constituted 25% of the membership, and 38% of articles published in the Journal of Mammalogy contained at least one female author. We also found, however, that the actual contributions of women as measured by order of author lagged behind these figures, presumably reflecting demographic trends in the ages and positions of female mammalogists. The most frequent topics of publication have been reproduction and development, and population ecology, followed closely by behavior. More female authors have been affiliated with universities in California (11%) than in any other state or country. Since the 1970s, women have been represented on the Board of Directors of the ASM, albeit generally in low numbers. The percentage of women serving on committees has varied considerably, averaging 29% in 1994. Most heavily represented are those committees with education and outreach-oriented missions. Of the honorary memberships given by the Society, only one has been awarded to a female mammalogist, but two of the Hartley H. T. Jackson awardees have been women. There has been one female recipient of the C. Hart Merriam Award. The percentage of female students receiving honoraria or grants-in-aid has increased significantly since the mid-1980s, and currently averages 25%. Overall, 17% of the Shadle Award winners have been women, with all but one receiving their award in the past decade.

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