Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

Dispersal Abilities and Genetic Population Structure of Insular and Mainland Oryzomys palustris and Peromyscus leucopus

Janet L. Loxterman, Nancy D. Moncrief, Raymond D. Dueser, Charles R. Carlson and John F. Pagels
Journal of Mammalogy
Vol. 79, No. 1 (Feb., 1998), pp. 66-77
DOI: 10.2307/1382842
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1382842
Page Count: 12
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($42.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
Dispersal Abilities and Genetic Population Structure of Insular and Mainland Oryzomys palustris and Peromyscus leucopus
Preview not available

Abstract

A comparative hierarchical approach was used to examine allozymic variability within and among nine populations of Oryzomys palustris (marsh rice rat) and seven populations of Peromyscus leucopus (white-footed mouse) from the Virginia barrier islands and southern Delmarva Peninsula. O. palustris is an effective disperser over water and is present on 21 of 24 islands. In contrast, P. leucopus is a less effective disperser over water and occurs on only four of 24 islands. Of 31 loci, four were variable in O. palustris; six were variable in P. leucopus. The nine populations of O. palustris had an average heterozygosity of 2.4% with 6.7% polymorphic loci. For seven populations of P. leucopus, the average heterozygosity was 3.6% with 12.3% polymorphic loci. Both species had lower levels of variation among mainland populations than among island populations. Populations of P. leucopus exhibited considerable genetic differentiation (F ST=0.180) and lower levels of gene flow (Nm=1.14) among populations, whereas O. palustris had moderate levels of differentiation (F ST=0.135) and higher levels of gene flow (Nm=1.60) among populations. Mantel tests indicated a significant relationship between genetic distance and geographic distance in Oryzomys but not in Peromyscus.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
66
    66
  • Thumbnail: Page 
67
    67
  • Thumbnail: Page 
68
    68
  • Thumbnail: Page 
69
    69
  • Thumbnail: Page 
70
    70
  • Thumbnail: Page 
71
    71
  • Thumbnail: Page 
72
    72
  • Thumbnail: Page 
73
    73
  • Thumbnail: Page 
74
    74
  • Thumbnail: Page 
75
    75
  • Thumbnail: Page 
76
    76
  • Thumbnail: Page 
77
    77