Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

A New Bat (Chiroptera: Natalidae) from the Early Miocene of Florida, with Comments on Natalid Phylogeny

Gary S. Morgan and Nicholas J. Czaplewski
Journal of Mammalogy
Vol. 84, No. 2 (May, 2003), pp. 729-752
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1383917
Page Count: 24
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($42.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
A New Bat (Chiroptera: Natalidae) from the Early Miocene of Florida, with Comments on Natalid Phylogeny
Preview not available

Abstract

We describe a new extinct genus and species of bat belonging to the endemic Neotropical family Natalidae (Chiroptera) from the Thomas Farm Local Fauna in northern peninsular Florida of early Miocene age (18-19 million years old). The natalid sample from Thomas Farm consists of 32 fossils, including a maxillary fragment, periotics, partial dentaries, isolated teeth, humeri, and radii. A proximal radius of an indeterminate natalid is reported from the I-75 Local Fauna of early Oligocene age (about 30 million years old), also from northern Florida. These fossils from paleokarst deposits in Florida represent the 1st Tertiary records of the Natalidae. Other extinct Tertiary genera previously referred to the Natalidae, including Ageina, Chadronycteris, Chamtwaria, Honrovits, and Stehlinia, may belong to the superfamily Nataloidea but do not fit within our restricted definition of this family. Eight derived characters of the Natalidae sensu stricto are discussed, 5 of which are present in the new Miocene genus. Intrafamilial phylogenetic analysis by parsimony of the Natalidae suggests that the 3 living subgenera, Natalus (including N. major, N. stramineus, and N. tumidirostris), Chilonatalus (including C. micropus and C. tumidifrons), and Nyctiellus (including N. lepidus), deserve full generic rank. The Natalidae apparently evolved in North America before the late Oligocene, went extinct in what is now the Nearctic region (i. e., Florida) after the early Miocene, and survived in tropical Middle America during the remainder of the Tertiary. The presence of 2 endemic genera and 4 endemic species suggests that natalids reached the West Indies by overwater dispersal early in their history (Oligocene or Miocene). The lack of a Tertiary fossil record, marginal distribution, and limited species richness and endemism of natalids in South America are suggestive of a comparatively late arrival on that continent, possibly in the late Pliocene after the beginning of the Great American Faunal Interchange.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
729
    729
  • Thumbnail: Page 
730
    730
  • Thumbnail: Page 
731
    731
  • Thumbnail: Page 
732
    732
  • Thumbnail: Page 
733
    733
  • Thumbnail: Page 
734
    734
  • Thumbnail: Page 
735
    735
  • Thumbnail: Page 
736
    736
  • Thumbnail: Page 
737
    737
  • Thumbnail: Page 
738
    738
  • Thumbnail: Page 
739
    739
  • Thumbnail: Page 
740
    740
  • Thumbnail: Page 
741
    741
  • Thumbnail: Page 
742
    742
  • Thumbnail: Page 
743
    743
  • Thumbnail: Page 
744
    744
  • Thumbnail: Page 
745
    745
  • Thumbnail: Page 
746
    746
  • Thumbnail: Page 
747
    747
  • Thumbnail: Page 
748
    748
  • Thumbnail: Page 
749
    749
  • Thumbnail: Page 
750
    750
  • Thumbnail: Page 
751
    751
  • Thumbnail: Page 
752
    752