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The Myth-Ritualist Theory of Religion

Robert A. Segal
Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion
Vol. 19, No. 2 (Jun., 1980), pp. 173-185
DOI: 10.2307/1386251
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1386251
Page Count: 13
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The Myth-Ritualist Theory of Religion
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Abstract

According to the myth-ritualist theory, religion is primitive science: through myth and ritual, which operate together and constitute its core, religion magically manipulates the world. Many of the leading theories of religion present alternative views of the relationship and function of myths and rituals. Even if false, the myth-ritualist theory is valuable in suggesting aspects of religion which might otherwise get overlooked. Similarly, charting its alternatives suggests other aspects of religion which might also be missed.

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