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Religion and the Meaning of Work

James C. Davidson and David P. Caddell
Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion
Vol. 33, No. 2 (Jun., 1994), pp. 135-147
DOI: 10.2307/1386600
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1386600
Page Count: 13
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Religion and the Meaning of Work
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Abstract

Most studies of work focus almost exclusively on secular antecedents of "work commitment," "work involvement," and work as a "central life interest." We argue that religion also influences the way people think of work. We use data from 1,869 Protestants and Catholics to test a theory that includes six religious factors, five work conditions, and other personal attributes. Work-related factors have the most effect, followed by religion, especially religious commitment and social justice beliefs. Among personal attributes, education, family income, and gender have a significant effect on orientations toward work.

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