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Religion and Well-Being among Canadian University Students: The Role of Faith Groups on Campus

B. Gail Frankel and W. E. Hewitt
Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion
Vol. 33, No. 1 (Mar., 1994), pp. 62-73
DOI: 10.2307/1386637
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1386637
Page Count: 12
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Religion and Well-Being among Canadian University Students: The Role of Faith Groups on Campus
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Abstract

Social science research examining the relationship between religion and health has produced equivocal results, although evidence from more recent studies points toward a link between inward or intrinsic religion and both mental and physical well-being. This study offers a further examination of this emergent association by comparing the health status of two specific respondent groups drawn from a population of Canadian university students. The first consists of members of a range of campus Christian faith groups, and the second is a comparison or nonaffiliated group chosen from the student body at large. The results of the study reveal a positive relationship between faith group involvement and various aspects of health status, and thus support previous positive findings. At the same time, they reinforce the need for further research on the association between specific aspects of religiosity and well-being.

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