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Religion and Attitudes toward the Environment

Andrew Greeley
Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion
Vol. 32, No. 1 (Mar., 1993), pp. 19-28
DOI: 10.2307/1386911
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1386911
Page Count: 10
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Religion and Attitudes toward the Environment
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Abstract

This essay is an attempt to expand a study reported in 1989 of the relationship between religion and concern for the environment in Tulsa, Oklahoma. Here, only one variable was used, willingness to spend money on the environment, but findings were based on a national data set. The finding of the Tulsa study is confirmed: Low levels of environmental concern correlate with a biblical literalism. They also correlate with being Christian and with confidence in the existence of God. On the other hand, support for environmental spending correlates positively with a gracious image of God and with being Catholic. However, explanatory models suggest that it is not biblical literalism as such which relates to lack of environmental concern, but rather a rigid political and religious "story."

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