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The Religion/Science Conflict

A. A. Sappington
Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion
Vol. 30, No. 1 (Mar., 1991), pp. 114-120
DOI: 10.2307/1387154
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1387154
Page Count: 7
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The Religion/Science Conflict
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Abstract

Two basic approaches to reducing the perceived religion/science conflict are: a) to alter either religious teachings or scientific theories, or b) to create a better understanding of the differences between science and religion. For example, an attempt to reduce perceived conflict through the use of new scientific data has been made by R. W. Sperry, whose discussion of the religious implications of recent developments in cognitive psychology is presented here, along with some related developments in an area called "chaos." It is argued that these developments do not support religious concepts. However, they may serve as a source of analogies or new ways of thinking to aid in the understanding of religious concepts.

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