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Religious Orientation, Antihomosexual Sentiment, and Fundamentalism among Christians

Aubyn S. Fulton, Richard L. Gorsuch and Elizabeth A. Maynard
Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion
Vol. 38, No. 1 (Mar., 1999), pp. 14-22
DOI: 10.2307/1387580
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1387580
Page Count: 9
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Religious Orientation, Antihomosexual Sentiment, and Fundamentalism among Christians
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Abstract

Christian antihomosexual sentiment was hypothesized to be a function of respondents' Fundamentalist (F) beliefs, low Intrinsic (I) and high Extrinsic Social (Es) motivation, and a lack of a Questing (Q) approach. These hypotheses were confirmed. When Fundamentalism was controlled, high Intrinsics were more accepting of homosexuals than low Intrinsics. Participants were more opposed to homosexuals than they were to heterosexuals, but no more opposed than they were to liars and racists. While there was some evidence that fundamentalist antipathy toward homosexuals is consistent with their theological ideology (F correlated with morally legitimated antipathy), there was substantial evidence that it was in excess of what is required by their ideology (F correlated with nonmorally legitimated antipathy, and with several indicators of excess antipathy).

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