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Social Death: Or Whatever Happened to Doc Daneeka?

Stanford W. Gregory, Jr. and Jerry M. Lewis
The Pacific Sociological Review
Vol. 18, No. 1 (Jan., 1975), pp. 68-82
DOI: 10.2307/1388223
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1388223
Page Count: 15
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Social Death: Or Whatever Happened to Doc Daneeka?
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Abstract

This paper examines the novel "Catch-22" by Joseph Heller (1955) as a source of insights into the process of social death as articulated in the work of David Sudnow's (1967) "Passing On". Heller's depiction of the "death" of Doc Daneeka offers a different approach to social death than the one described by Sudnow. While the paper focuses on one topic, social death, its essential point is to promote the use of satire and irony in the formulation of social theory, and to discuss the epistemic implications of this departure from traditional sociological thinking.

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