Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Identificational Assimilation of Japanese Americans: A Reassessment of Primordialism and Circumstantialism

Hisako Matsuo
Sociological Perspectives
Vol. 35, No. 3 (Autumn, 1992), pp. 505-523
Published by: Sage Publications, Inc.
DOI: 10.2307/1389332
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1389332
Page Count: 19
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($40.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Identificational Assimilation of Japanese Americans: A Reassessment of Primordialism and Circumstantialism
Preview not available

Abstract

Using both quantitative and qualitative data collected in Portland, Oregon during 1989, this study tests two contradictory models of ethnic identity: primordialism and circumstantialism. Two questions are addressed: 1) does the third generation of Japanese Americans retain ethnic identity or has the group achieved complete identificational assimilation?; and 2) what factors impacted the group's identificational assimilation? The study suggests that there is attenuation of ethnic identity between successive generations. However, multivariate analyses indicate that the seemingly different ethnic identity of the second and third generations does not necessarily evidence the significance of generation in the identificational assimilation. Childhood and adult social networks are found to have the greatest effect on ethnic identity. This study also found that generational shift does not lead to identificational assimilation if and when successive generations are placed in the same circumstances.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[505]
    [505]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
506
    506
  • Thumbnail: Page 
507
    507
  • Thumbnail: Page 
508
    508
  • Thumbnail: Page 
509
    509
  • Thumbnail: Page 
510
    510
  • Thumbnail: Page 
511
    511
  • Thumbnail: Page 
512
    512
  • Thumbnail: Page 
513
    513
  • Thumbnail: Page 
514
    514
  • Thumbnail: Page 
515
    515
  • Thumbnail: Page 
516
    516
  • Thumbnail: Page 
517
    517
  • Thumbnail: Page 
518
    518
  • Thumbnail: Page 
519
    519
  • Thumbnail: Page 
520
    520
  • Thumbnail: Page 
521
    521
  • Thumbnail: Page 
522
    522
  • Thumbnail: Page 
523
    523