Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

The Globalization of Women's Status: Consensus/Dissensus in the World Polity

Nitza Berkovitch and Karen Bradley
Sociological Perspectives
Vol. 42, No. 3 (Autumn, 1999), pp. 481-498
Published by: Sage Publications, Inc.
DOI: 10.2307/1389699
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1389699
Page Count: 18
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($40.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
The Globalization of Women's Status: Consensus/Dissensus in the World Polity
Preview not available

Abstract

The amount of attention devoted to women and women's issues has increased dramatically in the last five decades throughout the world. In this article we examine the cultural construction of women that guided such action by analyzing texts that were produced and activities that were undertaken in relation to women by international organizations from 1945 through 1995. We show that the modernist principles of universalism, liberal individualism, and rationality provided the cultural framework for this global project. We compare the ways in which two issues important to women, education and genital mutilation, were constructed by global actors and the implications of this meaning making for action over time. Our analysis reveals an important link between the extent to which an issue is constructed to be consistent with the modernist principles and the extent to which it receives global attention. /// [Spanish] El monto de atención mundialmente dedicada a la mujer y a problemas de la mujer se ha incrementado dramáticamente en las últimas cinco décadas. En este trabajo examinamos la construcción cultural de mujeres que han guiado dicha acción a través del análisis de textos que fueron producidos y de actividades que fueron emprendidas en relación a la mujer por organizaciones internacionales de 1945 a 1995. Demostramos que los principios modernistas de universalismo, individualismo liberal y racionalidad han suministrado el marco cultural para este proyecto global. Comparamos cómo dos problemas relevantes a la mujer, educación y mutilación genital, fueron construidos por actores globales y las implicaciones de la acción con el tiempo de la construcción de este significado. Nuestro análisis revela un vinculo importante entre el punto en el cual un problema es construido para ser consistente con los principios modernistas y el punto en el que los problemas reciben atención global. /// [Chinese] (Unicode for Chinese abstract). /// [Japanese] (Unicode for Japanese abstract).

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[481]
    [481]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
482
    482
  • Thumbnail: Page 
483
    483
  • Thumbnail: Page 
484
    484
  • Thumbnail: Page 
485
    485
  • Thumbnail: Page 
486
    486
  • Thumbnail: Page 
487
    487
  • Thumbnail: Page 
488
    488
  • Thumbnail: Page 
489
    489
  • Thumbnail: Page 
490
    490
  • Thumbnail: Page 
491
    491
  • Thumbnail: Page 
492
    492
  • Thumbnail: Page 
493
    493
  • Thumbnail: Page 
494
    494
  • Thumbnail: Page 
495
    495
  • Thumbnail: Page 
496
    496
  • Thumbnail: Page 
497
    497
  • Thumbnail: Page 
498
    498