If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

Fictive Kin as Social Capital in New Immigrant Communities

Helen Rose Ebaugh and Mary Curry
Sociological Perspectives
Vol. 43, No. 2 (Summer, 2000), pp. 189-209
Published by: Sage Publications, Inc.
DOI: 10.2307/1389793
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1389793
Page Count: 21
  • Download PDF
  • Cite this Item

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
Fictive Kin as Social Capital in New Immigrant Communities
Preview not available

Abstract

Fictive kin, defined as family-type relationships, based not on blood or marriage but rather on religious rituals or close friendship ties, constitutes a type of social capital that many immigrant groups bring with them and that facilitates their incorporation into the host society. We describe three types of fictive kin systems in different immigrant populations and argue that their functions are similar across various ethnic groups and types of fictive kin relationships. Fictive kin systems expand the network of individuals who provide social and economic capital for one another and thereby constitute a resource to immigrants as they confront problems of settlement and incorporation. While anthropologists have long noted systems of fictive kin in premodern and modernizing societies, sociologists have paid little attention to fictive kin networks. We argue, however, that systems of fictive kin constitute an important part of the social networks that draw immigrants to a particular locale and provide them with the material and social support that enables them to become incorporated into a new and often hostile society. Data are derived from interviews with informants from various immigrant groups in Houston, Texas, and from a Yoruba community in Brooklyn, New York. /// [Spanish] El parentesco ficticio, definido como un tipo de relaciones familiares, no está basado en lazos consanguineos o matrimoniales, sino en rituales religiosos o lazos amistosos muy cercanos, éste constituye un tipo de capital social que varios grupos de inmigrantes traen con sigo mismo lo que facilita su incorporación en la sociedad anfitriona. En este trabajo, describimos tres tipos de sistemas de parentesco ficticio en diferentes poblaciones de inmigrantes, y argumentamos que estas funciones son similares a través de varios grupos étnicos y tipos de relaciones de parentesco ficticio. Los sistemas de parentesco ficticio amplían la red de individuos que proporcionan capital social y económico entre ellos mismos, y por eso constituye un recurso para los inmigrantes cuando enfrentan problemas de asentimientos humanos y de incorporación. Mientras que los antropólogos han observado por bastante tiempo los sistemas de parentesco ficticio en sociedades premodernas y modernas, los sociólogos han puesto muy poca atención en las redes de parentesco ficticio. Sin embargo, argumentamos que los sistemas de parentesco ficticio constituyen una parte importante en las redes sociales que atraen a los inmigrantes a un escenario en particular y les proveen de un apoyo material y social que les permite incorporarse en una sociedad nueva y frecuentemente hostil. La información fue obtenida a través de entrevistas con varios grupos de inmigrantes en Houston, Texas, y de una comunidad de Yoruba en Brooklyn, Nueva York. /// [Chinese] (Unicode for Chinese abstract). /// [Japanese] (Unicode for Japanese abstract).

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[189]
    [189]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
190
    190
  • Thumbnail: Page 
191
    191
  • Thumbnail: Page 
192
    192
  • Thumbnail: Page 
193
    193
  • Thumbnail: Page 
194
    194
  • Thumbnail: Page 
195
    195
  • Thumbnail: Page 
196
    196
  • Thumbnail: Page 
197
    197
  • Thumbnail: Page 
198
    198
  • Thumbnail: Page 
199
    199
  • Thumbnail: Page 
200
    200
  • Thumbnail: Page 
201
    201
  • Thumbnail: Page 
202
    202
  • Thumbnail: Page 
203
    203
  • Thumbnail: Page 
204
    204
  • Thumbnail: Page 
205
    205
  • Thumbnail: Page 
206
    206
  • Thumbnail: Page 
207
    207
  • Thumbnail: Page 
208
    208
  • Thumbnail: Page 
209
    209