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Education and the Three 'P's: Policy, Politics and Practice a Review of the Work of S. J. Ball

Cecilia White and Stephen Crump
British Journal of Sociology of Education
Vol. 14, No. 4 (1993), pp. 415-429
Published by: Taylor & Francis, Ltd.
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1392887
Page Count: 15
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Education and the Three 'P's: Policy, Politics and Practice a Review of the Work of S. J. Ball
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Abstract

Theories of organisation actually become ideologies, legitimisations for certain forms of organisation. They deploy arguments in terms of rationality and efficiency to provide control. The limits that they impose upon the conception of organisations actually close down the possibility of considering alternative forms of organisation. This is nowhere more clearly evident than in the current application of management theories to schools. Such theories marginalise empirical studies of school practice and dismiss the 'folk-knowledge' of teachers as irrelevant. They are as significant for what they exclude as for what they include (Ball, 1987, p. 5).

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