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School to Work Programmes and the Production of Alienation

Chris Shilling
British Journal of Sociology of Education
Vol. 9, No. 2 (1988), pp. 181-198
Published by: Taylor & Francis, Ltd.
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1393033
Page Count: 18
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School to Work Programmes and the Production of Alienation
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Abstract

Since the late 1970s it has become generally accepted among British politicians that the transition of young people from school to work is a problematic process. The major response to this at the level of the school has been a proliferation of national and local vocationally oriented courses designed to ease this situation through creating a 'permanent bridge' to the labour market. This paper is an examination of a course which constitutes a central part of one of these schemes, the Schools Vocational Programme. It suggests that far from facilitating transfer from school to work, industrially oriented education may have the unintended consequence of alienating young people from sectors of waged-labour in the capitalist economy.

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