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The Method of Expected Number of Deaths, 1786-1886-1986, Correspondent Paper

Niels Keiding
International Statistical Review / Revue Internationale de Statistique
Vol. 55, No. 1 (Apr., 1987), pp. 1-20
DOI: 10.2307/1403267
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1403267
Page Count: 20
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The Method of Expected Number of Deaths, 1786-1886-1986, Correspondent Paper
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Abstract

The method of expected number of deaths is an integral part of standardization of vital rates, which is one of the oldest statistical techniques. The expected number of deaths was calculated in 18th century actuarial mathematics (Dale, 1777; Tetens, 1786) but the method seems to have been forgotten, and was reinvented in connection with 19th century studies of geographical and occupational variations of mortality (Neison, 1844; Farr, 1859; Westergaard, 1882; Rubin & Westergaard, 1886). It is noted that standardization of rates is intimately connected to the study of relative mortality, and a short description of very recent developments in the methodology of that area is included. /// La méthode du nombre de décès attendus est partie intégrante de la standardisation des taux vitaux, qui est l'une des plus anciennes techniques statistiques. Le nombre de décès attendus était calculé au XVIIIe siècle en mathématiques d'assurance (Dale, 1777; Tetens, 1786). Donc, la méthode semble oubliée pour être retrouvée au XIXe siècle en études des variations géographiques et professionelles de la mortalité (Neison, 1844: Farr, 1859; Westergaard, 1882; Rubin & Westergaard, 1886). On note que la standardisation des taux est étroitement liée à l'étude de la mortalité relative. Les développements récents de la méthodologie dans ce domaine sont brièvement décrits.

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