Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Some Surprising Results about Covariate Adjustment in Logistic Regression Models

Laurence D. Robinson and Nicholas P. Jewell
International Statistical Review / Revue Internationale de Statistique
Vol. 59, No. 2 (Aug., 1991), pp. 227-240
DOI: 10.2307/1403444
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1403444
Page Count: 14
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($12.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Some Surprising Results about Covariate Adjustment in Logistic Regression Models
Preview not available

Abstract

Results from classic linear regression regarding the effect of adjusting for covariates upon the precision of an estimator of exposure effect are often assumed to apply more generally to other types of regression models. In this paper we show that such an assumption is not justified in the case of logistic regression, where the effect of adjusting for covariates upon precision is quite different. For example, in classic linear regression the adjustment for a non-confounding predictive covariate results in improved precision, whereas such adjustment in logistic regression results in a loss of precision. However, when testing for a treatment effect in randomized studies, it is always more efficient to adjust for predictive covariates when logistic models are used, and thus in this regard the behavior of logistic regression is the same as that of classic linear regression. /// Les résultats de l'analyse de régression linéaire classique concernant l'effet d'ajustement pour des variables concomitantes sur la précision d'un estimateur d'exposition, sont souvent supposés s'appliquer de façon plus générale à d'autres types de modèles de régression. Dans cet article, on montre qu'une telle supposition n'est pas jutifiée dans le cas d'une régression logistique, où l'effet d'ajustement de variables concomitantes sur la précision est tout à fait different. Par exemple, en régression linéaire classique, l'ajustement pour une variable concomitante de prévision non confondante se traduit en une précision ameliorée. Par contre, le même ajustement en régression linéaire logistique, se traduit en une perte de précision. Quoiqu'il en soit, quand l'effet d'un traitement est testé dans une étude randomisée il est toujours plus efficace d'ajuster pour des variables concomitantes prévisionnelles quand un modèle logistique est utilisé et ainsi, le comportement en régression logistique est identique à celiu en régression linéaire classique.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[227]
    [227]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
228
    228
  • Thumbnail: Page 
229
    229
  • Thumbnail: Page 
230
    230
  • Thumbnail: Page 
231
    231
  • Thumbnail: Page 
232
    232
  • Thumbnail: Page 
233
    233
  • Thumbnail: Page 
234
    234
  • Thumbnail: Page 
235
    235
  • Thumbnail: Page 
236
    236
  • Thumbnail: Page 
237
    237
  • Thumbnail: Page 
238
    238
  • Thumbnail: Page 
239
    239
  • Thumbnail: Page 
240
    240