Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Safe Data versus Safe Settings: Access to Microdata from the British Census

Catherine Marsh, Angela Dale and Christopher Skinner
International Statistical Review / Revue Internationale de Statistique
Vol. 62, No. 1 (Apr., 1994), pp. 35-53
DOI: 10.2307/1403544
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1403544
Page Count: 19
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($12.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Safe Data versus Safe Settings: Access to Microdata from the British Census
Preview not available

Abstract

Census offices are squeezed between users demanding ever more data and concerns about data confidentiality and privacy. They respond by releasing data either in a tightly controlled setting or in a securely anonymised form to prevent identification. These two routes have been chosen for two separate products from the 1991 British Census of Population: the Samples of Anonymised Records and the linked census Longitudinal Study. In this paper the implications of the two policies are compared. In broad terms, ease of access in the former route is traded for fullness of information in the second. In the final sections of the paper, the risks of identification disclosure in both datasets are assessed. /// Les officiels du recensement sont pressés entre les utilisateurs exigeant plus de données que jamais, et l'inquiétude à l'égard de les menaces d'atteinte à la vie privée et à son caractère confidentiel. En réponse, les officiels mettent les données en circulation soit dans un environment étroitment controllé, ou alors sous une forme rendue sûre et anonyme afin de prévenir toute identification. Ceux sont les deux routes choisies pour deux produits distinct du Recensement de la Population britannique en 1991: les échantillons de données rendue anonymes et l'étude enchainé Longitudinal Study (étude longitudinale). Dans cet article, les implications des deux méthodes sont comparées. Généralement parlant, la facilité d'accès de la première route est troquée contre la richesse d'information de la seconde. Dans les dernier paragraphes, les risques de révélation d'identité sont evalués dans les deux dossiers.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[35]
    [35]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
36
    36
  • Thumbnail: Page 
37
    37
  • Thumbnail: Page 
38
    38
  • Thumbnail: Page 
39
    39
  • Thumbnail: Page 
40
    40
  • Thumbnail: Page 
41
    41
  • Thumbnail: Page 
42
    42
  • Thumbnail: Page 
43
    43
  • Thumbnail: Page 
44
    44
  • Thumbnail: Page 
45
    45
  • Thumbnail: Page 
46
    46
  • Thumbnail: Page 
47
    47
  • Thumbnail: Page 
48
    48
  • Thumbnail: Page 
49
    49
  • Thumbnail: Page 
50
    50
  • Thumbnail: Page 
51
    51
  • Thumbnail: Page 
52
    52
  • Thumbnail: Page 
53
    53