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Evidence for the Role of Contexts in Imagery and Recall

Ronald C. Petersen and Saied H. Jacob
The American Journal of Psychology
Vol. 91, No. 2 (Jun., 1978), pp. 305-311
DOI: 10.2307/1421540
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1421540
Page Count: 7
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Evidence for the Role of Contexts in Imagery and Recall
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Abstract

The role of contexts in the imaging process was investigated in a cued-recall study. Forty-eight subjects were instructed to form images for 17 noun tetrads in provided contexts. Subsequently, when given one member of the tetrad, they were required to recall the remaining three members of the group and the corresponding context. Results indicated that the capacity of the cue word to elicit the context was the most important factor determining recall, and if the context was recalled, the recall of the remainder of the tetrad tended to be exhaustive. Results are discussed in terms of a contextualist approach to memory and the encoding specificity principle.

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