Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Method for Studying the Invariant Knowledge Structure of Action: Conceptual Organization of an Everyday Action

Edward S. Reed, Michael Montgomery, Carolyn Palmer and John Pittenger
The American Journal of Psychology
Vol. 108, No. 1 (Spring, 1995), pp. 37-65
DOI: 10.2307/1423100
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1423100
Page Count: 29
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($18.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Method for Studying the Invariant Knowledge Structure of Action: Conceptual Organization of an Everyday Action
Preview not available

Abstract

A method is described for analyzing the cognitive structure inherent in an everyday action. This structure includes not only units of the action and their serial order, but also the aggregation of these units into various higher level units that function as components of the action. It is hypothesized that a special kind of unit, the crux, functions at every level of the action as an organizing center for units at that level. The method developed here begins with actual performances of a task, deriving the units of action within that task from consistencies across different subjects' performance in order to identify units that are invariant across everyday variations in styles of performance. A description of the task in terms of these units was given to naive adults who were required to make either local judgments of similarity among these units or a global judgment concerning how the units aggregate to organize the task. These judgments were analyzed in several ways to try to find invariant patterns of aggregation of the units. The evidence suggests that, at least for the task under study here (toothbrushing), such invariant hierarchical patterns are found and that they are based on cruxes.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[37]
    [37]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
38
    38
  • Thumbnail: Page 
39
    39
  • Thumbnail: Page 
40
    40
  • Thumbnail: Page 
41
    41
  • Thumbnail: Page 
42
    42
  • Thumbnail: Page 
43
    43
  • Thumbnail: Page 
44
    44
  • Thumbnail: Page 
45
    45
  • Thumbnail: Page 
46
    46
  • Thumbnail: Page 
47
    47
  • Thumbnail: Page 
48
    48
  • Thumbnail: Page 
49
    49
  • Thumbnail: Page 
50
    50
  • Thumbnail: Page 
51
    51
  • Thumbnail: Page 
52
    52
  • Thumbnail: Page 
53
    53
  • Thumbnail: Page 
54
    54
  • Thumbnail: Page 
55
    55
  • Thumbnail: Page 
56
    56
  • Thumbnail: Page 
57
    57
  • Thumbnail: Page 
58
    58
  • Thumbnail: Page 
59
    59
  • Thumbnail: Page 
60
    60
  • Thumbnail: Page 
61
    61
  • Thumbnail: Page 
62
    62
  • Thumbnail: Page 
63
    63
  • Thumbnail: Page 
64
    64
  • Thumbnail: Page 
65
    65