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Auditory Representational Momentum: Surface Form, Direction, and Velocity Effects

Timothy L. Hubbard
The American Journal of Psychology
Vol. 108, No. 2 (Summer, 1995), pp. 255-274
DOI: 10.2307/1423131
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1423131
Page Count: 20
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Auditory Representational Momentum: Surface Form, Direction, and Velocity Effects
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Abstract

In a series of four experiments, subjects were presented with inducing sequences consisting of either a series of discrete tones or a continuous frequency glide. A probe tone was then presented, and subjects judged whether the probe was the same pitch as the final pitch in the inducing sequence. When the final frequency of the inducing sequence was prolonged, subjects' memory for the final pitch was displaced forward in the direction of implied motion. When the final frequency of the inducing sequence was not prolonged, no consistent pattern of displacement was found. With descending auditory motion, faster velocities led to larger forward displacements than slower velocities, but with ascending auditory motion, velocity did not significantly affect displacement. In general, displacements were influenced by the direction and velocity of motion and by the duration of the final frequency, but not by whether the stimulus was presented in a continuous form or a discrete form. These results are consistent with Freyd's (1993) hypothesis that representational momentum does not depend upon the surface form of the stimulus and can be found when stimuli drawn from a continuous dimension are presented in either a continuous form or a discrete form.

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