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Effects of Face and Name Presentation on Memory for Associated Verbal Descriptors

Philip Kargopoulos, Zoe Bablekou, Eleftheria Gonida and Gregory Kiosseoglou
The American Journal of Psychology
Vol. 116, No. 3 (Autumn, 2003), pp. 415-430
DOI: 10.2307/1423501
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1423501
Page Count: 16
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Effects of Face and Name Presentation on Memory for Associated Verbal Descriptors
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Abstract

Sixty-four participants were tested on immediate and delayed recall of verbal information about people accompanied by photographs of them, in comparison to verbal information about people accompanied by written names of them. Forty-two descriptive sentences were shown in a fixed random order, each associated with a photograph of one of 6 people (7 facts per depicted person), and another 42 sentences were paired with the written name of one of 6 people (7 facts per named person). Participants had to recall as many facts about each face or name as they could, 5 min after the presentation and then a week later. More information was recalled when paired with a photographic image than when paired with a name, especially in the delayed recall condition. Facts referring to a certain face or name were not attributed to a different face or name. Females excelled males on both short- and long-term retention of information. Face-related performance improved significantly when participants became aware of the precise design and memory demands of the task, but name-related performance did not improve.

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