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Characteristics of Effective College Teachers as Perceived by Their Colleagues

Robert C. Wilson, Evelyn R. Dienst and Nancy L. Watson
Journal of Educational Measurement
Vol. 10, No. 1 (Spring, 1973), pp. 31-37
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1433938
Page Count: 7
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Characteristics of Effective College Teachers as Perceived by Their Colleagues
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Abstract

The purpose of the research was to study the dimensions faculty members associate with being a good teacher. One hundred nineteen faculty members described the most effective and least effective teacher they knew using a set of 67 statements. A principal-components analysis of the descriptions of effective teachers produced 5 factors: Research Activity and Recognition, Participation in the Academic Community, Intellectual Breadth, Relations with Students, and Concern for Teaching. Only Research Activity and Recognition was significantly related to the academic rank and discipline of teachers nominated as effective. Rank, discipline, age and length of teaching experience of the nominators were unrelated to their descriptions of effective teachers. However, faculty with heavier teaching loads were more likely to assign high scores on Concern for Teaching and low scores on Research Activity and Recognition to the teacher they nominated as effective.

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