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Differential Spatial Attraction of Private Colleges and Universities in the United States

John C. Lowe and Arthur Viterito
Economic Geography
Vol. 65, No. 3 (Jul., 1989), pp. 208-215
Published by: Clark University
DOI: 10.2307/143835
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/143835
Page Count: 8
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Differential Spatial Attraction of Private Colleges and Universities in the United States
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Abstract

This study assesses the market penetration of private colleges and universities in the conterminous United States. A hierarchy of geographic impact is evident. Examination of enrollments for 90 schools reveals that individual schools have either a local, regional, or national base of appeal. Correlation of market penetration and SAT scores clearly indicates that a school's academic competitiveness is a key determinant of its spatial impact. "Reputation" determines the size of a school's impact area, with significant implications for alternative recruitment strategies.

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