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Effects of Geographical Scale on Location Decisions in Manufacturing: The Atlanta Example

James O. Wheeler
Economic Geography
Vol. 57, No. 2 (Apr., 1981), pp. 134-145
Published by: Clark University
DOI: 10.2307/144138
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/144138
Page Count: 12
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Effects of Geographical Scale on Location Decisions in Manufacturing: The Atlanta Example
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Abstract

Manufacturing plants have different locational requirements and characteristics based on whether their locational decision primarily involved a spatial search at the national, regional, or local level. The analysis is derived from questionnaire data for the fifteen-county Atlanta, Georgia, metropolitan area. Nationally oriented plants are larger, more recently established, and more likely to be branch plants, and are more strongly represented in types of manufacturing in which the South has recognized locational advantages. Plants locating as a result of national searches obtain materials from a greater distance and serve wider markets.

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