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Containerization and the Load Center Concept

Yehuda Hayut
Economic Geography
Vol. 57, No. 2 (Apr., 1981), pp. 160-176
Published by: Clark University
DOI: 10.2307/144140
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/144140
Page Count: 17
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Containerization and the Load Center Concept
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Abstract

Containerization and intermodal transportation systems have a profound effect on port structure and port operation, have modified some of the traditional port functions, and have introduced new dimensions to port competition, port hierarchy, and hinterland delineations. In this paper a five-phase model illustrates the dynamic development process of a container port system and the rationale behind such development. A particular emphasis is being given to the phenomenon of concentration of container traffic in few, large ports-load centers. The North American container ports serve as a case study. It is difficult to weigh the importance of each factor in the development of a load center port, but a large-scale local market, high accessibility to inland markets, advantageous site and location, early adoption of the new system, and aggressiveness of port management are major factors to consider.

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