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Journal Article

Weeds, Polyploids, Parthenogenesis, and the Geographical and Ecological Distribution of All-Female Species of Cnemidophorus

John W. Wright and Charles H. Lowe
Copeia
Vol. 1968, No. 1 (Mar. 15, 1968), pp. 128-138
DOI: 10.2307/1441559
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1441559
Page Count: 11
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Weeds, Polyploids, Parthenogenesis, and the Geographical and Ecological Distribution of All-Female Species of Cnemidophorus
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Abstract

The apparently alloploid parthenogenetic species of Cnemidophorus have one primary center of distribution, which is in the North American Southwest adjacent to the Continental Divide and the area of confluence between the Rocky Mountains and the Mexican Plateau. Cnemidophorus cozumelus presents the single contrast to the distributional pattern of the remaining eight species, being distributed along the margin of the Yucatan Peninsula. The habitats occupied by the various all-female species are diverse but have a common denominator. Each habitat is characterized by such descriptive terms as disclimax, marginal, ecotone, transient, extreme, and perpetually disturbed, all of which define a "weed habitat." The presence of such habitats at the time of origin of parthenogenetic individuals from hybridization between bisexual species looms as a critical factor for the establishment of all-female populations, leading toward their potential perpetuation as successful parthenogenetic species.

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