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Ecology of Horned Lizards: A Review with Special Reference to Phrynosoma platyrhinos

Eric R. Pianka and William S. Parker
Copeia
Vol. 1975, No. 1 (Feb. 28, 1975), pp. 141-162
DOI: 10.2307/1442418
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1442418
Page Count: 22
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Ecology of Horned Lizards: A Review with Special Reference to Phrynosoma platyrhinos
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Abstract

The diffuse ecological literature on horned lizards (genus Phrynosoma) is assembled and condensed. Numerous aspects of their ecology are considered, including time of activity, thermoregulation, diet, stomach volume, foraging behavior, clutch or litter size and number of broods, reproductive effort, expenditure per progeny, testicular cycles, body size, sexual size dimorphisms, seasonal changes in size distributions, survivorship, growth rates, size and age at sexual maturity, movements and homing, predation and broken tails, competitors and selective pressures. Emphasis is given to the desert horned lizard, P. platyrhinos, although comparative data on many other species of Phrynosoma are also presented and discussed. Certain aspects of the anatomy, behavior, diet, temporal activity pattern, thermoregulation and reproductive tactics of horned lizards set this genus apart from most other species of lizards. This unique constellation of interrelated phenotypic traits is interpreted as a set of coadaptations that complement one another to make members of the genus ecologically successful.

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