Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Sexual Selection and Sexual Dimorphism in the Amphibia

Richard Shine
Copeia
Vol. 1979, No. 2 (May 18, 1979), pp. 297-306
DOI: 10.2307/1443418
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1443418
Page Count: 10
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($12.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Preview not available

Abstract

This paper reviews published literature on amphibians to examine predicted correlations between male combat and sexual dimorphism. Females grow larger than males in most species (61% of urodeles, 90% of anurans), but males are often larger than females in species in which males engage in physical combat with each other. Although amphibian male combat has been reported only rarely (in 19% of urodeles and 5% of anurans), the association between male combat and male body size equal to or larger than female body size is highly significant within the urodele suborders Salamandroidea (n = 25 spp.) and Ambystomatoidea (n = 46), in the urodeles as a whole (n = 79), in the anuran Dendrobatidae (n = 34) and Ranidae (n = 149), and in the anurans as a whole (n = 589). Similarly, large male size and the occurrence of male combat are highly correlated in a comparison between several anuran families. Spines and tusks of male anurans appear to be adaptations to male combat. Combat, large male size and sexually dimorphic weapons appear to be most common in species that are relatively invulnerable to predation while fighting, by virtue of large body size or toxic skin secretions.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
297
    297
  • Thumbnail: Page 
298
    298
  • Thumbnail: Page 
299
    299
  • Thumbnail: Page 
300
    300
  • Thumbnail: Page 
301
    301
  • Thumbnail: Page 
302
    302
  • Thumbnail: Page 
303
    303
  • Thumbnail: Page 
304
    304
  • Thumbnail: Page 
305
    305
  • Thumbnail: Page 
306
    306