Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

Dimorphism, Parasitism and Sex: Reproductive Strategies among Deepsea Ceratioid Anglerfishes

Theodore W. Pietsch
Copeia
Vol. 1976, No. 4 (Dec. 30, 1976), pp. 781-793
DOI: 10.2307/1443462
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1443462
Page Count: 13
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($12.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
Dimorphism, Parasitism and Sex: Reproductive Strategies among Deepsea Ceratioid Anglerfishes
Preview not available

Abstract

Knowledge of the reproductive biology of the Ceratioidei is reviewed and new and scattered evidence is brought together in an attempt to reevaluate some previously accepted ideas concerning the unique sexual habits of these fishes. Notes on taxonomic content, available material, occurrence of parasitism, gravid females and ripe males and the ability of males to ingest food independently of the female are given for each ceratioid family, after which this information is summarized and discussed. Data are presented to support at least three reproductive strategies utilized by ceratioid anglerfishes: sexually mature males of the Ceratiidae, Linophrynidae and perhaps the Neoceratiidae, are obligatory sexual parasites; those of the Caulophrynidae and the oneirodid genus Leptacanthichthys are probably facultative sexual parasites; and those of the Melanocetidae, Himantolophidae, Gigantactinidae and at least some oneirodid genera, are non-parasitic and perhaps spawn during a non-parasitic, temporary attachment. The four ceratioid families in which sexual parasitism has been previously recorded appear to form a highly specialized, monophyletic group, most likely derived from some oneirodid-like ancestor. If a facultative sexual parasitism exists for some ceratioids, particularly some oneirodid genera, it would form a convenient evolutionary intermediate between those ceratioids with obligatory sexual parasitism and those whose males never become parasitic.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
781
    781
  • Thumbnail: Page 
782
    782
  • Thumbnail: Page 
783
    783
  • Thumbnail: Page 
784
    784
  • Thumbnail: Page 
785
    785
  • Thumbnail: Page 
786
    786
  • Thumbnail: Page 
787
    787
  • Thumbnail: Page 
788
    788
  • Thumbnail: Page 
789
    789
  • Thumbnail: Page 
790
    790
  • Thumbnail: Page 
791
    791
  • Thumbnail: Page 
792
    792
  • Thumbnail: Page 
793
    793