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The Non-Cost of Brooding in Ambystoma opacum

Robert H. Kaplan and Martha L. Crump
Copeia
Vol. 1978, No. 1 (Feb. 10, 1978), pp. 99-103
DOI: 10.2307/1443828
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1443828
Page Count: 5
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
The Non-Cost of Brooding in Ambystoma opacum
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Abstract

Ambystoma opacum is the only member of a primarily aquatic-breeding genus of salamanders that remains with its eggs after terrestrial deposition. In order to determine the energetic cost of this "parental investment," we compared dry weight, total calories, weight-specific caloric content and ash content in females that had just begun to brood with those near completion of brooding. Differences in these four variables between the two groups are not significant at P ≤ 0.05. The argument that brooding females are at an energetic disadvantage because they are unable to forage is discarded because males collected from the area during the same period also had empty stomachs and intestines. We therefore suggest that there is no increase in energetic cost due to brooding in A. opacum.

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