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The Role of Visual and Olfactory Cues in the Prey Catching Behavior of the Tiger Salamander, Ambystoma tigrinum

Sarah B. Lindquist and Marilyn D. Bachmann
Copeia
Vol. 1982, No. 1 (Feb. 23, 1982), pp. 81-90
DOI: 10.2307/1444271
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1444271
Page Count: 10
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
The Role of Visual and Olfactory Cues in the Prey Catching Behavior of the Tiger Salamander, Ambystoma tigrinum
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Abstract

Prey catching behavior of Ambystoma tigrinum was studied by comparing the responses of individual animals to visual, chemical and visual plus chemical cues from earthworms. The intensity of feeding activity was highest when a visual cue, alone or in combination with a chemical stimulus, was present. Efficiency of detection, location and capture of prey was greatest when both visual and chemical prey stimuli were available. Fewer feeding components in a predatory behavioral sequence were necessary to detect and capture prey items placed closer to the salamander; however, initial orientation of the animal to the prey stimulus did not influence the complexity of a feeding sequence. The intensity of search activity after prey ingestion did not change significantly from that exhibited before prey localization. Visual stimuli appear most important in detection and capture of actively moving prey, whereas olfactory stimuli may function in recognition of edible prey items.

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