Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access JSTOR through your library or other institution:

login

Log in through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Journal Article

Fish Predation: A Factor Affecting the Spatial Distribution of a Stream-Breeding Salamander

James W. Petranka
Copeia
Vol. 1983, No. 3 (Aug. 16, 1983), pp. 624-628
DOI: 10.2307/1444326
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1444326
Page Count: 5

You can always find the topics here!

Topics: Larvae, Streams, Fish, Fish larvae, Larval development, Salamanders, Predation, Predators, Eggs, Ecology
Were these topics helpful?
See somethings inaccurate? Let us know!

Select the topics that are inaccurate.

Cancel
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($12.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Add to My Lists
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Fish Predation: A Factor Affecting the Spatial Distribution of a Stream-Breeding Salamander
Preview not available

Abstract

Four lines of evidence indicate that larvae of the smallmouth salamander, Ambystoma texanum, are restricted to the upper portions of breeding streams because of fish predation: 1) A strong inverse relationship exists between the spatial distribution of fish and A. texanum larvae in streams in Kentucky, Indiana, and Ohio, 2) A. texanum larvae are palatable to several fish species that commonly occur in breeding streams, 3) A. texanum larvae can survive to metamorphosis in portions of streams from which they normally are excluded so long as fish are removed, and 4) fish that are washed into pools rapidly eliminate local pool populations of A. texanum larvae. Larvae are highly susceptible to predation because they show little tendency to remain beneath cover during the day when predatory fish are active. Selection may favor diurnal activity in order to maximize growth and development and, subsequently, avoid even greater mortality from stream drying.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[624]
    [624]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
625
    625
  • Thumbnail: Page 
626
    626
  • Thumbnail: Page 
627
    627
  • Thumbnail: Page 
628
    628
Part of Sustainability