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The Roles of Temperature and Dissolved Oxygen in Microhabitat Selection by the Tadpoles of a Frog (Rana pipiens) and a Toad (Bufo terrestris)

Rosemarie Noland and Gordon R. Ultsch
Copeia
Vol. 1981, No. 3 (Aug. 26, 1981), pp. 645-652
DOI: 10.2307/1444570
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1444570
Page Count: 8
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
The Roles of Temperature and Dissolved Oxygen in Microhabitat Selection by the Tadpoles of a Frog (Rana pipiens) and a Toad (Bufo terrestris)
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Abstract

Dissolved oxygen and temperature data from habitats frequented by the tadpoles of Rana pipiens and Bufo terrestris are related to laboratory studies of rates of oxygen consumption ( V̇ O2 ), Q10, critical oxygen tensions ( P c), and critical thermal maxima (CTM). Both species were acclimated to 22, 27 and 32 C for studies of physiological parameters. CTM was higher for both species in the earlier stages of development, and was higher in Bufo than in Rana at all temperatures. V̇ O2 was higher in Bufo tadpoles than in Rana. The P c increased with temperature in all stages of Bufo, but only in the younger stages of Rana. Field studies showed that Bufo tadpoles were found in warmer, more highly oxygenated microenvironments than were Rana tadpoles. It is suggested that shallow-water breeders, such as Bufo, emphasize adaptations to high temperatures, while permanent-water forms, such as Rana, emphasize adaptations to variations in oxygen availability.

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