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Journal Article

Male Territoriality and Female Mate Selection in the Dart-Poison Frog Epipedobates trivittatus (Dendrobatidae, Anura)

Margarete E. Roithmair
Copeia
Vol. 1994, No. 1 (Feb. 1, 1994), pp. 107-115
DOI: 10.2307/1446676
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1446676
Page Count: 9
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Male Territoriality and Female Mate Selection in the Dart-Poison Frog Epipedobates trivittatus (Dendrobatidae, Anura)
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Abstract

The social and reproductive behavior of the dart-poison frog Epipedobates trivittatus was studied in Amazonian Peru for two wet seasons. Males were territorial and used calls to establish and advertise their territories. Territory size ranged from 4-156 m2 and was positively correlated with length of residency and number of days of calling activity of the owner. Fifty-five percent of all territorial males successfully mated at least once. Successful males of E. trivittatus called on more days and defended larger territories than did unsuccessful males. Male body size and mating success were not correlated. The number of matings a particular male obtained was influenced by territory size, calling activity and length of residency. Females were not territorial and were never attacked when approaching calling males. Females rejected males during court-ship by leaving males or refusing nest sites. Females (n = 17) did not mate randomly. Six females sampled calling males before mating and seemed to prefer owners of large territories for mating. Females only mated once. Territories provide residents with sufficient space for mate attraction and reproduction without interference from rivals. Because territory size is dependent on calling activity, which involves high energetic costs, it is suggested that territory size reveals male quality. Mate-choice behavior of females E. trivittatus is suggested to be consistent with the sequential comparison rule.

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