Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Conservation Genetics of the Ashy Darter, Etheostoma cinereum (Percidae: Subgenus Allohistium), in the Cumberland and Tennessee Rivers of the Southeastern United States

Steven L. Powers, Richard L. Mayden and David A. Etnier
Copeia
Vol. 2004, No. 3 (Aug. 20, 2004), pp. 632-637
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1448483
Page Count: 6
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($12.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Conservation Genetics of the Ashy Darter, Etheostoma cinereum (Percidae: Subgenus Allohistium), in the Cumberland and Tennessee Rivers of the Southeastern United States
Preview not available

Abstract

The Ashy Darter, Etheostoma cinereum (Percidae: subgenus Allohistium), is restricted to flowing pools of relatively silt free, medium-sized rivers in the Cumberland, Duck and Tennessee River drainages in the southeastern United States. Degradation of these habitats within these drainages has fragmented the range of E. cinereum into several disjunct populations and eliminated it from many historical localities. Phylogenetic analysis of cytochrome b sequence from individuals (n = 14) representing each of the extant populations of E. cinereum indicated genetic differentiation among populations inhabiting the Cumberland, Duck, and upper Tennessee River drainages. These analyses are concordant with previously noted patterns of morphological variation and minimally support three different management units (MU) currently recognized as E. cinereum. Efforts to conserve these distinct MUs should be considered in management attempts.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[632]
    [632]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
633
    633
  • Thumbnail: Page 
634
    634
  • Thumbnail: Page 
635
    635
  • Thumbnail: Page 
636
    636
  • Thumbnail: Page 
637
    637