Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Experimental Design in Studies of Snake Behavior

Neil B. Ford
Herpetological Monographs
Vol. 9 (1995), pp. 130-139
Published by: Herpetologists' League
DOI: 10.2307/1467001
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1467001
Page Count: 10
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($15.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Experimental Design in Studies of Snake Behavior
Preview not available

Abstract

Snakes have unique qualifications as experimental subjects, and the use of these animals in behavioral research has gradually increased. They have been models for comparative studies of innate prey preferences and for studies on sensory signals involved in reproductive behavior. Examples from these studies indicate the importance of keeping in mind both statistical methods and the natural behavior of the particular species when designing experiments on snakes. Randomized designs are the most powerful but require larger sample sizes, and so repeated or blocked designs have more often been used in snake studies. How replication affects the inferences drawn is rarely discussed. Nor have most authors evaluated the role of factors that may increase variation in the behavior of snakes, i.e., temperature, stress, feeding condition, shedding cycle, and general health and temperament of the individual subject. Future research on snakes will supply increased understanding of the behavioral ecology of this interesting group, but more care in the design of experiments will be important.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
130
    130
  • Thumbnail: Page 
131
    131
  • Thumbnail: Page 
132
    132
  • Thumbnail: Page 
133
    133
  • Thumbnail: Page 
134
    134
  • Thumbnail: Page 
135
    135
  • Thumbnail: Page 
136
    136
  • Thumbnail: Page 
137
    137
  • Thumbnail: Page 
138
    138
  • Thumbnail: Page 
139
    139