Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

A Multidisciplinary Investigation of the Applicability of the Pleistocene Herpetofaunal Stability Model to Collared Lizards (Crotaphytus collaris)

Delbert W. Hutchison, Simon T. Malcomber and L. Susan Pletscher
Herpetological Monographs
Vol. 13 (1999), pp. 81-141
Published by: Herpetologists' League
DOI: 10.2307/1467061
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1467061
Page Count: 61
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($15.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
A Multidisciplinary Investigation of the Applicability of the Pleistocene Herpetofaunal Stability Model to Collared Lizards (Crotaphytus collaris)
Preview not available

Abstract

Recent paleontological evidence suggests the North American herpetofauna has been remarkably stable taxonomically and biogeographically throughout the Pleistocene. However, this paper uses paleontological, ecological, and molecular genetic data to argue that the thermophilous and xerically-adapted Collared Lizard (Crotaphytus collaris) did not persist in the northern parts of its range during glacial phases of the Pleistocene. First, a careful review of the paleontological data used to support the stability model reveals no northern fossils unambiguously dated to glacial phases. Second, environmental conditions inferred for the Ozark Plateau and Flint Hills during glacial phases were not compatible with fitness requirements of collared lizards. Third, phylogeographic analyses of an intraspecific mtDNA gene tree suggest a recent invasion of the Ozarks and Flint Hills. Finally, microsatellite data are statistically consistent with a Holocene invasion but not with long-term occupation of the Ozarks or the Flint Hills by collared lizards. These combined data sets provide strong evidence that collared lizards are able to occupy northern parts of their range only during the warmer, drier interglacials. Other thermophilous and xerically-adapted reptilian species might be expected to show similar historical patterns.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
81
    81
  • Thumbnail: Page 
82
    82
  • Thumbnail: Page 
83
    83
  • Thumbnail: Page 
84
    84
  • Thumbnail: Page 
85
    85
  • Thumbnail: Page 
86
    86
  • Thumbnail: Page 
87
    87
  • Thumbnail: Page 
88
    88
  • Thumbnail: Page 
89
    89
  • Thumbnail: Page 
90
    90
  • Thumbnail: Page 
91
    91
  • Thumbnail: Page 
92
    92
  • Thumbnail: Page 
93
    93
  • Thumbnail: Page 
94
    94
  • Thumbnail: Page 
95
    95
  • Thumbnail: Page 
96
    96
  • Thumbnail: Page 
97
    97
  • Thumbnail: Page 
98
    98
  • Thumbnail: Page 
99
    99
  • Thumbnail: Page 
100
    100
  • Thumbnail: Page 
101
    101
  • Thumbnail: Page 
102
    102
  • Thumbnail: Page 
103
    103
  • Thumbnail: Page 
104
    104
  • Thumbnail: Page 
105
    105
  • Thumbnail: Page 
106
    106
  • Thumbnail: Page 
107
    107
  • Thumbnail: Page 
108
    108
  • Thumbnail: Page 
109
    109
  • Thumbnail: Page 
110
    110
  • Thumbnail: Page 
111
    111
  • Thumbnail: Page 
112
    112
  • Thumbnail: Page 
113
    113
  • Thumbnail: Page 
114
    114
  • Thumbnail: Page 
115
    115
  • Thumbnail: Page 
116
    116
  • Thumbnail: Page 
117
    117
  • Thumbnail: Page 
118
    118
  • Thumbnail: Page 
119
    119
  • Thumbnail: Page 
120
    120
  • Thumbnail: Page 
121
    121
  • Thumbnail: Page 
122
    122
  • Thumbnail: Page 
123
    123
  • Thumbnail: Page 
124
    124
  • Thumbnail: Page 
125
    125
  • Thumbnail: Page 
126
    126
  • Thumbnail: Page 
127
    127
  • Thumbnail: Page 
128
    128
  • Thumbnail: Page 
129
    129
  • Thumbnail: Page 
130
    130
  • Thumbnail: Page 
131
    131
  • Thumbnail: Page 
132
    132
  • Thumbnail: Page 
133
    133
  • Thumbnail: Page 
134
    134
  • Thumbnail: Page 
135
    135
  • Thumbnail: Page 
136
    136
  • Thumbnail: Page 
137
    137
  • Thumbnail: Page 
138
    138
  • Thumbnail: Page 
139
    139
  • Thumbnail: Page 
140
    140
  • Thumbnail: Page 
141
    141